Monday, February 5, 2007

Supper on the Side Porch

"There was a big brown bean pot standing on a little side table. It was steaming and rich with molasses, and had been simmering in the oven all the afternoon and now was sending out most delicious fragrance. There were big thin pink slices of cold ham, delicious fried potatoes with a tang of onion in them, puffy hot raised biscuit, baked apples with the thickest richest cream imaginable and squares of golden sponge cake for dessert.

The side porch was wide and spacious and turned a corner of the house, so that the space allotted to the table was large enough for a room. The outlook was over meadows to the mountains . . ."

--Grace Livingston Hill, Beauty for Ashes

Baked Beans (America's Cook Book, 1940)

1 qt. navy beans
1/2 lb. fat salt pork
2 t. salt
1 T. brown sugar
1/4 c. dark molasses
1/2 t. dry mustard
1/2 t. Worcesersthire sauce
boiling water


Wash and soak beans in cold water overnight; drain, cover with fresh water and cook slowly until skins break. To test: take a few beans on tip of spoon and blow on them gently; if skins break and curl back, they are sufficiently cooked. Turn beans into bean pot. Pour boiling water over pork, scrape rind until white, score in 1/2-inch strips and press into top of beans, leaving only rind exposed. Mix salt, brown sugar, molasses, mustard, and Worcestershire sauce; add 1 cup boiling water and pour over beans. Add additional water to cover beans, if necessary. Cover and bake in slow oven for 6 to 8 hours, adding additional water to keep beans just covered; uncover last half hour to brown pork and beans. One small onion may be placed in bottom of bean pot.

12 comments:

Mrs. Wilt said...

Sounds heavenly, and just right for the chilly weather we are having right now!

I was in a flea market the other day and I picked up an old blue clothbound copy of Ladybird. It will be my first GLH book, and all because of you, Anna. :o) I have really enjoyed perusing through your new blog as well as the older PVS archives lately. So much vintage charm...you are my inspiration for homekeeping! :o)

Anna said...

Mrs. Wilt--I should caution you that GLH has a whole list of more historical fiction--mostly set in the Wild West--that is, to me, not nearly as compelling as her more domestic fiction. I've read and enjoyed Ladybird, but it's just not the same as her non-Western stories.

Anna

G.L.H. said...

Beauty for Ashes is one of my very favorites--the way the girls discover their father's "secret" life. Thanks for sharing this portion.

31 Girl said...

Where can I get a copy of Honor Girl? I have been looking everywhere! I really want to read this story but can't seem to find it - any suggestions? Thank you!

Anonymous said...

Anna, Just wanted to let you know that I raced down to the vintage bookstore this morning and found Honor Girl at a glance! I too have been inspired to start reading GLH. Kim B.

Mrs. Wilt said...

Anna,
Thank you for letting me know! I would love to see a list of your GLH "domestic favorites" so that I can be on the lookout. Your quotes are always so inspiring!

Peggy said...

Classifying the books of GLH is an interesting idea. I have read nearly all of them and it is true that some are more "homey" and domestic than others. Someday I'd like to make a listing that describes the titles. It would be a big job, because I can't remember distinct plots of most of them!

Jenny said...

What a delightful blog! So glad to have found such a place celebrating GLH. I look forward to reading more.

Lisa said...

Anna,
I just finished enjoying The Honor Girl. As I was reading it I was reminded of Francine Rivers' book Leota's Garden. Have you read it? A young girl visits her grandmother and moves in with her to help. She becomes very domestic and I love the descriptions in the book. They also work on the garden together and have a lovely garden party at the end. It is one of those books that you wish you could live in. :)
Blessings,
Lisa

Sweetproserpina said...

An inspiring quote. I used your recipe yesterday to make baked beans. It was such a yummy smell from the oven on a cold, rainy day. Thank you!

Kimberly said...

Could you substitute ham for the salt pork? I've never seen salt pork for sale in my area, but I am baking a ham this weekend...

Kimberly said...

Could you substitute ham for the salt pork? I've never seen salt pork for sale in my area, but I am baking a ham this weekend...